Race Execution.

 controlled…controlled!

controlled…controlled!

Ironman Arizona is right around the corner. I have raced this race maybe seven times? Since I have been racing pro the conversation remains the same. Do I ride with the group I get out the water with, or ride my power? I am motivated by competition, so I like to be in the mix. I like to be riding with people and know I am placing well. The trouble is, this means a dynamic ride. The stronger riders will try to drop the weaker ones, there will be surges, accordions, and epic explosions.

The major allure is what if… What if I make it to the end of the bike with this group and we ride a 4:16? That would be huge! It would also set me up well for a PR. If I was talking to myself as coach, I would tell myself how ludicrous that is. Even if I somehow made it to the end of the bike with the group, the power spikes and intensity of the ride would fry my run, and I would likely run a 3:10-3:15.

The more likely scenario is that I would ride the first two loops with the group, then soft pedal the last loop and try to salvage a run. This has happened countless times. It is hard to explain the challenge of letting guys ride away in hopes of catching them later. I have rarely been able to do this. I have been really focusing my run in order to be more run confident. I am hoping this will make it easier to ride my race and set myself up to run well off the bike.

 The smile of a well paced race!

The smile of a well paced race!

So, all that being said, here is the plan. The swim is always the same. I hope to start hard, and latch on to the fastest group I can. Once I am out of the water I will glance at the clock, but it doesn’t matter, on to the ride. I am going to try my hardest to hold 240 watts all day. If there is a group riding close, under 260 I might try to stay with them. I hope to be able to ride the last loop at 240 watts and not be forced to self pedal. According to best bike split, this will give me a 4:30. This is just about five minutes faster than last year. My normalized power would be just about the same, but the application of this power will be very different. That is the goal. To be steady all day.

If I ride steady, not only will I ride faster, I will also feel better for the run. I am hoping to run a 2:56. I plan on doing this by running steady 6:40s, just like my ride. I am hoping that will get me across the line in about a 8:26. Hopefully by writing this race plan down will help hold me accountable and help me to make good decisions while I race!

As I said, this is not what I am best at. I know it can help me get the best result. So, I am working on letting my ego go. This will aloha me to let riders go, and focus on my race. Ideally all the other details will come together, and make this goal attainable.

A race ready bike.

Here are a few tips from a bike hygiene slacker. I don’t love the act of taking care of my bike. I love my bike, and I love going fast. Here are a few things you should do before every race!


 Tucson rain!

Tucson rain!

  1. Wash your bike. I cannot tell you how many problems go away with a clean bike; and a clean bike is a fast bike! So wash your bike! I lightly hose it off. I then take a few brushes and some soapy water and go over it all. I use a separate brush for anywhere near the drive train. then a give it another light rise. After a few minutes in the Tucson sun I towel dry it and use this opportunity to get any missed dirt off.

  2. Replace your chain! I use a race day chain Ice chain. It is crazy fast, and they re-ice it! What could be better? At a minimum use some lube and clean and lube your drive train. You can buy a chain washer, or run it through a rag a bunch of times. Then add a little of clean lube and lightly dry it off.

  3. Race day wheels. I use DSD. They are a great Tucson company that roll fast! I make sure I have make brakes clean then a dress up my bike with a deep front wheel and a disc. A disc is ALWAYS faster. If this is not an option make sure your wheels are clean!

  4. Hydration. Bottle placement can really aid in aerodynamics. I will say that hydration is more important, so have a system you can use. Beyond that, you want an aero bottle on the frame, and an aero hydration system up front between the bars. Then either one or two bottles behind the seat. All round bottles should be out of sight of the wind. Again, this is if you can. Staying hydrated is infinitely more important!

  5. Bike numbers. They need to be well put on the frame. No wrinkles or waves. If they are on some sort of holder, it needs to be totally secure and inline with the top tube.

  6. Race tires/tubes. Since I have a dedicated set of race wheels this is easy. If not I recommend racing with a specific race day tire. Many companies make a fast race tire. These tires have a low rolling resistance and are light! Here is a resource to find out about them: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews . I also race with latex tubes. They are more supple than butyl and lower rolling resistance.

  7. Tire Pressure. On the same vein, I always check my tire pressure race morning. Tire pressure is a hotly debated topic. I found this resource helpful: http://trstriathlon.com/talking-tires-with-joshua-poertner/ I evaluate the road conditions the day before the race and do my best to make a good guess of what to go with from there.

  8. Nutrition. I am lucky, my Dimond has a “lunch box” for food storage. If your bike does not you must work to get it out of the wind. Gels on the top tube are not the most aero. I recommend some type of after market aero box add on. You can also pre mix your gels in an aero bottle and have one high calorie bottle to sip on throughout the race. No matter what you do, bring fuel! try to bring it as aero as possible!

  9. Helmet. Slightly away from your actual bike is your race helmet. An aero helmet is the most inexpensive way to “buy speed” ideally you would take your bike to a shop and put in on a trainer. Then you can test out a bunch of aero helmets to see which one fits with your position and riding style.

  10. Triple check everything. Most of us train a lot. A bike like anything else, needs maintenance. I like to run through every bolt and make sure it is still tight. If you ride roads like we have in Tucson, you know that things can get rattled around. The last thing you want is a loose bolt on race day. I have had my aerobars land on my front wheel and it is not a pleasant experience!

 At minimum the bike is fast!

At minimum the bike is fast!

Race Day: Nutrition.

 reaching for all the food

reaching for all the food

A few of my athletes are approaching their first half Ironman. This means a lot of questions, many of which revolve around nutrition. When it comes to race day nutrition, a few basics that every athlete can start with are hydration, electrolytes, and calories. All of the guidelines I am going to lay out are just that: Guidelines. They are not set in stone and can change drastically based on the temperature, athlete, dietary restrictions, and nutrition history (aka the often repeated rule: do not try anything new on race day!). Practice with many nutrition products, including what they have on course. Know how you react to them, then make a plan.

Let’s get to the basics. In races over two hours nutrition can make or break your race. Make sure you show up on the start line with hydrated and with full glycogen stores. I try to eat a big breakfast and lunch the day before the race, then taper off my meals and have smaller snacks the rest of the day. My breakfast is typically carb heavy and varies depending on what is available. For my later lunch, I like to eat a grain centered meal, such as rice with a little bit of chicken and veggies. I keep my snacks carb heavy as well, such as cereal and peanut butter and honey sandwiches. Race morning I eat a carb heavy meal about three hours before the race start. I shoot for 800 to 1000 calories from mixed sources such as a bowl of oatmeal, toast, and a banana. Peanut butter and honey usually accompany all three of these. I also focus on drinking water and some sort of electrolyte drink throughout the day before and morning of the race. If I feel like I need it, I have a gel right before the start of the race.

 breathing in water

breathing in water

Once in the water I try hard to take in nothing. After getting on the bike is when the real fueling begins. This is the most important leg for fueling. In order to have a good run, you need to start as well fueled and hydrated as possible. I like to think about how I would fuel if I was going to run a standalone half marathon or full marathon. I would have a good breakfast and be well hydrated going in to those races, so I want to start the run leg as close to this state as possible.

 calories and water on board!

calories and water on board!

The gut can process at most about 100 grams of carbs an hour. This is 400 calories of pure carbohydrate so likely closer to 450 calories with other macro nutrients. In order to actually process that much you need to practice. Smaller people may be lower. The range is about 250 calories to 450. This is affected by the intensity level, practice, and the source of the calories. I aim for the high end - about 400 calories an hour on the bike. When I started I maxed out closer to 200. This has been a learned skill I have worked on over the years. You also need to make sure you are consuming enough water and electrolyte in order to digest these. Minimum requirements are a bike bottle an hour, but I think two bottles an hour is a better goal, unless it is a cold race.

Electrolyte consumption varies a lot depending on the person. Some people just can drink a little sports drink while others take multiple salt pills an hour. This must be based on practice, but I believe that having some plan for electrolytes is important. Think about what you crave after a longer session. If you crave fries and chips - you are likely a salty sweater! You can also look at your clothes after a long ride. Are they white with salt? If so, you need to be supplementing with electrolytes. Again, water is key. You need to take in enough water to digest the electrolytes you are ingesting.

 Gel in hand!

Gel in hand!

During the run of a half ironman I stick to 2-3 gels. I also try to alternate drinking water and gatorade at every aid station. It is much more challenging to take in calories while running. I find I max out closer to 250 compared to the 400 while riding. It may surprise you to hear that I switch to flat coke for the last third of the run!

I can’t say enough about flat coke. People talk a lot about eating clean, and racing on products with good ingredients. When all else fails flat coke seems to always work. My one word of caution, is to try to wash it down with a little water, and once you start, don’t stop! It is a fast fuel source, so you need to keep dumping it in! The point is, nutrition is key, but it might be simpler than you think. Play around and figure out what works for you!

Art of the taper

Tapering, or the act of reducing training in the immediate time leading up of a race, is an extremely important part of every athletes plan. The goal of the taper is making sure the body has enough recovery time to absorb the training block leading into the race. The taper should leave the body rested so that it can perform at its peak on race day. A tired body will always be slower than an over rested one.

The other aspect to consider is how an athlete feels on race day. We want the athlete to be confident and feeling race ready, as well as actually being race ready (sometimes these don’t always go hand in hand). We need to keep in mind though, even if the athlete feels sluggish from too much rest, they will still out perform a tired athlete. So, we cannot sacrifice the body for the mind.

 race travel just got a little harder…

race travel just got a little harder…

Coaching today is full of metrics. We have training peaks WKO with TSS to create optimal training stress for the current CTL come race day. HRV and RHR analysis and sleep monitoring to help determine an athletes readiness to train and race. HRV and RHR even can help show the effect of travel and pre race nerves ignored to plan for those stresses. But, the total package on how to go from adequate training stress into travel and pre-race leaving an athlete fit and rested on the start line is 100% an art. These data points are great, and can be helpful along the way. How an athlete responds to travel, rest, and taper itself influences the structure of a taper for each athletes.

When tapering, stress from children, work, and life also need to be taken into consideration. Is the week before a trip to a race more stressful because you are trying to get ahead at work? Is this trip going to be harder than usual because you are traveling with a 5 month old? Then the standard travel questions: Are you changing time zones? Going out of the country? Have a long travel day? Are you in general a stressful traveler?

All of these factors plus a million others need to go into how much rest you have in your taper. Remember if you are fit ten days before, your most important job is to show up to the starting line rested a ready to go.

My Fastest Mile. Ever.

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I’ve recently been easing my way back into training after Ironman Mont Tremblant. I had done a couple of tempo runs, and a few runs with strides, when the group I run with (LTTC) were going to the track to do 4 x 1 mile with three minutes rest. They were going to do these at 5k effort, and I was planning on seeing what I could do. I drafted behind Max for 98% of the 4x 1 mile, and in the process ran my fastest and second fastest mile ever. Again, this was done after NO speed work!

How was I able to do this? After Ironman I also got back to the gym. I find that when my fitness is okay, and I make sure I am consistent with my lifts, magic can happen. Lifting helps recruit muscle fiber and allows the muscles to fire correctly. When you have everything firing and show up to the track, these breakthroughs can happen. I don’t think a ton of speed work is necessary to achieve this. Small workouts, like strides, are great to stay in touch with your speed. Then, every once in a while you can fire out a hard session.

Why don’t I give all my athletes strength work then? If you do it right, it is great! If you do it wrong, however, it is a fast track to injury. Since I can’t go to the gym with my athletes for every session, I shy away from sending beginner lifters on their own to the gym. The other challenge is easing your way into lifting takes a huge amount of discipline. One day of progressing too aggressively and you can end up sore for days. Lifting needs to complement your training, not take away from it.

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If you are in Tucson and you want to get into lifting - shoot me a message! I am looking at setting up a winter intro to lifting class in order to get people comfortable in the gym!

Iron Mind.

Lately I have been helping my athletes with something a little different. We have already taken care of the physical side. They have trained hard. They have trained smart. How do we make sure that translates on race day? One huge obstacle is in the way: Their minds. In order to perform your best you need to be mentally ready to endure the suffering of race day. 

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It is your brains job to put a governor on you and tell you to back off. Your brain wants to preserve your body to live to fight another day. It is not interested in PRs and doesn't know that you have a race schedule that allows for ample rest after this event. It wants to make sure if a Lion comes at you in ten minutes, you are still ready to go. 

Step one in overcoming this is being physically prepared. The next step is knowing this is going to happen so that you don't let your mind fool you. The last step is flipping the equation. Use your mind to your advantage. You are a smart athlete. You have had success in workouts, in life, and likely in past races. You also most likely have an idea what you start to do wrong as you fatigue. For example, I tilt my head back, tighten my shoulders, and run with my quads. 

I have athletes use this to create mantras. I tend to think of these a little differently though. I don't have them use some quote read from a book. This is an experience. A workout you nailed, a past race, or just a time when you needed to be extra gritty in life. I have athletes take these experiences and create a few words to spark that memory recall. So an athlete saying "I am strong" in their mind can really mean "I rode to the top of Lemmon so I am a strong cyclist." I also have athletes create form mantras. This is more simply positive reminders of how to perform. For me I remind myself that I run eyes forward and shoulders relaxed. 

These two types of mantras have gotten me through a lot of dark places! No matter the race, you will struggle mentally at some point, that is just your brain doing it's job. Last up - don't forget to smile! The power of smiling and telling yourself you feel good is real.  Make sure you are ready to use your brain to your advantage!

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Pre Race

Wednesday's Words: Pre Race

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As the fall race season approaches I have been getting lots of questions about what to do before a race. So, I decided to write about what I do as an example of how a pre race plan could look. Every race plan should include a detailed pre race plan. You want to be able to be in auto pilot on race morning and avoid any decision making. I know I don't think clearly on race morning! My plan is always the similar and it goes something like this:

I wake up three hours and 15 minutes before the race start. The first thing I do is drink a cup of coffee and start eating breakfast. This changes based on availability, but is high carbohydrate low fat and low protein. In IM Mont Tremblant I had two peanut butter and honey sandwiches with a banana and coffee. After this I am sipping on a bottle or two with some sort of electrolyte the rest of the morning. I then pack up my race nutrition and transition bag. I run through my list and make sure it is all there! Now it is time to pin on my timing chip (I always either add some tape or a safety pin to the strap). I get dressed in my race kit, Heart rate monitor and am ready to go. I make sure race morning I check my tire pressure and set it where it needs to be based on the race course. I either re-lube my chain or make sure my ICE'd chain is looking good. Last up I make sure my bike is in the appropriate gear based on the transition set up. I head to race site plenty early because I don't think I have ever done a race that required less than three trips to the port-o-let. 

Once I arrive to the race site I make sure my shoes, watch, bib, hat and gels are in my run bag, and my helmet and sunnies are in my bike bag. On to my bike, I add on my nutrition, bike computer and shoes. I double check tires, chain, gearing and have my computer on and auto paused ready to go. I check that I have my wetsuit and swim skin with my race cap and goggles ready to go. As well as some anti- chaff product for me and my wetsuit. 

Now that my gear is already I go for a short 10 min warm up jog. This is slow. I might get in a little over a mile. Then I do some glute activation, light stretching and mobilization for my legs, arms and shoulders. After my body is warm, I move onto my mind. I find a place to sit and get mentally prepared for what is about to happen. 

Time to lube up and put on the wetsuit. I make sure to put lube on the lower legs and wrists so I can pop them off easily in T1, and I tighten my goggles from "practice loose" to "race tight". I do a gel and finish my water 15ish minutes before the start and try to get in the water 10 minutes early to do a little warm up swim, get used to the water and make sure I can get a front line spot for the start. I take a few deep breaths, run through a positive mantra, and smile because the gun is about to go off!  

 serious business before the start!

serious business before the start!

Spring Round Up!

So much racing has happened this spring! Sarah Sullivan ended the spring season with her first Ironman 70.3 at St. George. She had lofty goals of going sub 5 on her first attempt on a hilly course. She crossed the line in 4:53 , placing third in her age group! The podium has become a familiar place for Sarah, as she landed on the top step in a number of other races this spring. She won the Javelina Chase, the Tolero Crit, and the Southern AZ Omnium. She was also a close second with friend and "double trouble" teammate Christine Hoffman in the Tucson Bicycle Classic, and the South Mountain TT. Sarah has a fast and bright future in any sport!

 

 It's windy on the top step!

It's windy on the top step!

Christopher Villegas has also had a fast and furious spring! He raced the La Paz Stage race, two local crits, Valley of the Sun Omnium, Tucson Bicycle Classic, and a mountain bike race! He recently took 3rd in a local crib in Hermosillo! Look out for him moving up the fields as he gains race experience. 

 Chris looking smooth at TBC

Chris looking smooth at TBC

Sarah Smith has been on a training tear this spring! She has had her nose to the grindstone, putting in more hours and miles than ever before. She started the season with a HUGE PR and an age group win at Oro Valley Sprint. Since then she has been working hard to tackle her first 70.3 this summer. Keep your eye out for her at Boulder 70.3 in August. 

 

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John Ryan is back in the mix after an off season. He has his first race of the year coming up. Best of luck to John at the Utah Half Marathon!

Also back in the mix is Laura Reddoch! She took very little actual time off training as she gave birth to their fourth girl in March. Welcome to the Reddochs, Emilia! She is gearing up for the Arizona State Road Race, just 13 weeks after Emilia was born! She will then continue her triathlon career, so look out tri world, Laura is back!

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Pat Mcintosh has been on another level this season. He raced the South Beach Triathlon as a season opener and was able to shake the rust off and get ready for the race season. Next up was The Around the Mountain Sprint Tri, where he placed fourth in his age group. What a race! He is is gearing up for Eagleman 70.3 in a couple weeks!

 Making that TST kit look good!   

Making that TST kit look good!

 

Neil Johnson has been working hard all spring, as his long runs are now twice as far as they used to be. He is diving in head first into triathlon by gearing up for his first half ironman -  Arizona 70.3 this October. The summer of heat training here in Tucson will leave him more than prepared for the race in the fall!

The newest edition to the Top Step Training Team is Yolanda Jordan! Keep an eye out for her everywhere! She is on the move and training hard while she's on the road. This season she has already raced Desert Classic Duathlon, Oro Valley Duathlon, Oceanside 70.3, and Cactusman Olympic distance tri. She has a full summer and fall planned with a few races leading into Ironman Cozmel! 

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My partner in crime here in Tucson, Tyler Jordan, had a solid start to 2018! He ran away from us all at Desert classic Du and land in the second spot. Later in the spring he strapped on a bib number again at the Cactus Man Olympic in Phoenix. Little did he know that Sebastian Kienle was using it as a tune up for St. George! Does going 2nd to Sebi count as a win? After that, he helped me out by driving out to Wildflower with me! This turned out to be a fun trip and solid plan as Tyler and I both landed in the money! He is now headed back East to jump into a couple of 70.3s out there.

 Kaori Photo for the win!

Kaori Photo for the win!

 

The man, the myth, the legend Cameron Hummels is up next. He has had some high highs and some low lows this spring. He turned 40, and had a stellar 40 mile run to celebrate the milestone. This set him up for the Leona Divide 50 mile run. He was a bit sick and the race didn't go as planned. That sickness coupled with some injuries this spring have held him back a bit. However, he has gutted it out and is on the other side! He is just weeks away from the Northface Lavadero Ultra Trail 110k in Italy! Now that he is back on track I am excited to see what he can do!

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Sara Frye is another new addition to Top Step Training. She kicked off the year with the Arizona Distance Classic half marathon. It was a great start to the year and gave us a good base to build her triathlon career! Next up was the Oro Valley Sprint Triathlon. She was 3rd in her age group with an awesome race! She currently is hard at work getting ready for her first half ironman this Fall at the Arizona 70.3!

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Adam Feigh of feighathlon.com is racing Victoria 70.3 this weekend! This will be his first race as a father! I expect some dad power will come out the second half of the run, so look out for that!  He has been busy training a ton for Ironman Canada, but has still had time to sneak in a few local wins this year. He crushed the bike leg of a 70.3 relay in Mountains to Main, cruised to a win at the Parris Island Triathlon, and earned himself Chick-fil-A for a year at the Chick-fil-A 5k! I am excited to see what this Dad can do the second half of the season, and hope I never have to race him again!

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Long time athlete stepping back into the triathlon world, Vanessa Brown, is back! She has been training hard in a few other disciplines but now is back to Triathlon! She has been back at it for a little while now and raced her first tri this spring. She placed 2nd overall in the HITS Olympic in Napa! She wasn't sure if she was ready... looks like it worked out! Look for her next at the Superfrog Half in San Diego this Fall.

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Last but certainly not least is Caleb Brantley! After absolutely crushing his first Ironman last season, Caleb has been spending some time in a different direction. He has done a bit more running and raced some Xterra races this spring. He raced Xterra Renegade with a crazy challenging course a few weeks ago. This left him hungry and better prepared for the next one! The weekend before he raced the Sahuarita Olympic Triathlon! Despite not feeling super fresh, he landed on the top step! Earlier this season he raced the Super Seal Olympic and had a strong showing on a tough and long course. Let's not forget the marathon he did, pacing his wife to a BQ at the Phoenix Marathon in February. Next up for him is Xterra Deuces Wild!

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The Race Season begins!!!

Our first big weekend of racing happened!!

 Nice race Caleb and Laurel!

Nice race Caleb and Laurel!

We had Caleb race the Oracle Rumble half marathon. In prep for his up coming marathon, Caleb ran a hard half on trails! It was a great fitness bump to get him on the road to an early season marathon. 

 Caleb smiling his way through his first race of the year!

Caleb smiling his way through his first race of the year!

 

Cameron was back in Tucson for the Oracle Rumble as well. After an epic long run the weekend before, he was a ready to rock! Unfortunately, he met the wrong side of a rock, and ended up with a broken radial head in his elbow. He is TOUGH and will be back out there before you know it!

 Toping out in the snow

Toping out in the snow

 Cameron leading the way on our 21 mile journey!

Cameron leading the way on our 21 mile journey!

 

Adam Feigh raced TWICE this weekend. The most exciting bit on that is that he landed on the Top Step in both races!! He won the All Saints 5k on Saturday. Although he did not PR, he was close. His season is just getting underway so to be fit enough to be just off his PR is a great sign for the year!

 Finishing STRONG!

Finishing STRONG!

Sunday Adam raced a 50 mile gravel race. This is not his specialty. He did it on a road bike. He was planning on it as a hard ride to cap off a good week of training. But, you know what happens when the gun goes off! He spent a large portion of the race off the front, and was able to cross the line that way! Great racing Adam!

 Adam ridin' Dirty!

Adam ridin' Dirty!

Last weekend Chris Villegas raced a Crit in Hermosillo, and hung on for second place! He was in the sprint against an entire team of guys. Racing solo, he did his best to take them down. We were both excited to see him roll into the season with a second place! 

 Chris in the #2 spot!

Chris in the #2 spot!

Welcome Tyler Jordan!

As we roll into 2018 Top Step Training has a slew of announcements to make. We have some changes in our roster for the new year. The first change is that we are adding in Professional Triathlete, amateur male model, and fellow Tucsonian Tyler Jordan! He is a youngster with his eyes set on the 70.3 circuit. He has a background in running and riding and I expect big things from him this season!

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Ironman AZ - Mr. Hairy Bison - Tour de Tucson

     What a weekend of racing! Ironman AZ is Tucson's home race. This means a ton of friendly faces on course, and all of the spectators! I had the pleasure of racing with Top Step athlete Caleb, and Top Step affiliate Leo Carrillo. Caleb raced his first Ironman. He went in with mixed expectations. His dream goal was to go sub 11 hours, but really we were focusing more on the controllable things and getting across the finish line happy and healthy. This seemed to work pretty well as he CRUSHED his dream goal and finished in a 10:35!!

 a little too much fun out there!

a little too much fun out there!

 Support Crew's rock!

Support Crew's rock!

 Caleb the IRONMAN 

Caleb the IRONMAN 

     Leo had a dream day out there. He raced a smart race, and earned himself a Kona spot! At age 50 he had the 21st fastest swim-bike including PROS! He held on on the run for a 10:02, good enough for second in his age group and a chance at the big dance. 

 Serious business on that bike!

Serious business on that bike!

 Is that a smile?

Is that a smile?

 Kona baby!

Kona baby!

     I was a little unsure of how my third Ironman in three months was going to go. The preparation going in went well. I was feeling good all around, but nervous about the backend of the marathon. I stuck to my race plan, and rode at my goal watts. I felt the best I have EVER felt getting off the bike. I ended up with some serious stomach cramping, which seemed to be my limiter. My legs got pretty heavy the last few miles. I was getting splits on Clint, behind me and I heard I had a five minute gap. I so I was content to jog it in. After I crossed the line, I saw him cross right behind me! I am glad it did not end up in a duel. I am excited to finish in the money and the top ten at this one. A huge thanks to all the people cheering, volunteering, and to my amazing support crew. 

 pure gold!

pure gold!

     Also this weekend Adam Feigh raced AGAIN! He raced a 30k trail run for the title Mr. Hairy Bison. He also wanted to set a PR and a course record. I love that he aims high! He raced an extremely smart race, and let the leader go off fast. He was on track to break the two hour mark, setting the record and to pass the leader at about 1 km to go! He missed a step and almost snapped his foot off. He somehow ran it in, still setting a PR but he had to settle for second. 

 we need to discuss his attire

we need to discuss his attire

     Finally, Josh raced El Tour de Tucson. This was his conciliation prize for skipping IMAZ this year due to a broken bone in his pelvis! He will be back to triathlon and racing an Ironman this spring, don't you worry! He had a great El tour, and finished in 4:10 with the lead pack!

 in the pack!

in the pack!

A first time Ironman and two more PR's!!

Jason Klein finishes his first Ironman! They had some warm weather at Ironman Los Cabos, by he made it across the line in 10:34! He combated a heat index of 95 degrees, major travel delays and the fact that is was his first at the distance. Overall what a huge success!

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Adam Feigh can't stop, won't stop. a quick three weeks after his last triathlon he is pinning a bib on again to take win and a huge PR of 1:14 in the Lexington half marathon. Read what he has to say: Adam's Blog

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A mere matter of hours after returning from India Patrick McIntosh strapped on a bib and ran the Delaware Canal half marathon. He cracked two hours for the very first time! He is well on his way!

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Weekend round up!

Patagonia Sprint Tri

Sarah Smith was second overall in the patagonia sprint tri! She had a great race on a challenging course. What a way to end her season! She will be in the lab next weekend to dial in some numbers in order to go even faster in 2018!!

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Austin 70.3

Pat Macintosh tackled ANOTHER 70.3 over the weekend! His quest to go sub 6 continues, but the times are coming down! Awesome job, and some solid improvements made. More to come!

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90km Road Race

Last up over the weekend, Chris took on a 90km Road Race in Mexico! He fought hard as a solo rider against a bunch of other teams. He dug deep and with no lead out train he still managed to hang on for second! Keep your eye on this guy!

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